asker

universalcomicbooklover asked: I think with math, it is complex, yet can be satisfying to understand, but it also depends on who is teaching the subject. There are teachers who will teach math in a way that's boring and stressful, no added fun into finding the answer and all. I've hated math, just because I've had so many teachers that were snobby and made me uninterested in math, based on their attitude and teaching style.

Thank you, that was something i forgot to mention.

I also think teaching style has a big role in it. I had 1 teacher in year 11 (15 year olds) who was just ecstatic about math, he loved it, and it showed in his teaching style. I was already interested in mathematics by the time i had him as a teacher, so i guess that played a big role in my education.

But if you have a bad teacher, i really hope you blame the teacher and not the subject. incompetent teachers play an enormous role in the failure of education systems.

Luckily at the university level all lecturers are enthusiastic about what they’re teaching, and its wonderful to see them teach it.

asker

Anonymous asked: A lot of people just don't have the type of brain to ever understand it! Do you think writing essays and poetry is fun?

I always hated this explanation.

I completely disagree with the whole two sides of a brain argument - where a person is either more interested in art and music and literature, OR science and mathematics.

I do actually enjoy poetry, anon. And depending on the subject - i also enjoy writing essays. I love history, and politics, and creative writing (i even tried writing fanfic, though my grammar was horrible at the time.)

I think it just comes down to a lack of understanding, people see numbers and think ‘ew’ and so they don’t even try to understand what they mean, and so many people complain when they’re first taught algebra - “letters have no place in math.” Well i haven’t seen any number in mathematics in years, its all just letters. Real mathematics is a general solution, and general solutions have no numbers.

The most common answer im getting is “It’s the way its taught. incorrect answers are punished, etc.” 

(Answers to This post about mathematics)

Which I think is quite comical, literally every school subject is taught like that, except maybe art. Get the wrong date in a history essay? you get penalized. Spell a word wrong in english? Penalized. Say the wrong meaning of a word in spanish? Penalized.

And yet still math is hated more than any of those subjects.

I was also getting a lot of learning dissibilites as a problem, which i accept as a problem for some people (dyscalculia is like dyslexia with numbers.)

I think a big problem is people hear all the time that math is hard, that its boring and that its confusing, so kids going into middle school or high school seeing new problems in mathematics and having a few difficulties understanding them give up far too quickly. No one understands math right away, unless you’re one of those very few 1-in-a-million math geniuses that get doctorates at the age of 17. Everyone struggles at first, but if you try and try and try you will understand it, and trust me when i say this - it is fun!

I remember this one time in year 13 (last year of high school) i was with a few friends and they were all studying for a math test, I had found this one question earlier that seemed close to impossible, no one could do - so i sat there while my friends were all studying, trying to do this one problem and it took literally 4 hours straight - but i did it. and it was an amazing feeling finally finishing it, it was like doing a jigsaw puzzle but having 1 missing piece and finding it after hours of searching.

And since then I always use the analogy - Math is like a puzzle, and should be approached with the same attitude as every other puzzle - like its a fun challenge.

Why do people actually hate mathematics??

This isnt one of those posts explaining a question posed in the title… i’m actually curious - I Love mathematics.

I dont understand how people don’t like it, even when i find a concept hard to understand (which has been a lot, lately) I still enjoy it and want to figure it out. I have always loved it, all the way up through high school and now i’m majoring in it (and physics) at university. I honestly don’t understand why it gets so much hate, It’s Fun!! 

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

 

Plankton Found on the Exterior of the International Space Station!
While examining samples taken from the exterior surface of the ISS, scientists discovered something completely unexpected - Marine Plankton living on the surface, despite the harsh condition (Vacuum, temperature, and radiation.)
There was evidence that the plankton had been living there for years, and possibly even developing, too.
This gives more plausibility to the panspermia theory - that life all over the solar system/galaxy/universe is all related thanks to bacteria catching rides on asteroids and comets. We already know it is possible for rocks to be thrown away from a planet by something like an asteroid impact or large volcanic eruption - some meteorites have had their lineage traced back to mars.
So do you believe the panspermia theory to be plausible? what about alien life in general?

Plankton Found on the Exterior of the International Space Station!

While examining samples taken from the exterior surface of the ISS, scientists discovered something completely unexpected - Marine Plankton living on the surface, despite the harsh condition (Vacuum, temperature, and radiation.)

There was evidence that the plankton had been living there for years, and possibly even developing, too.

This gives more plausibility to the panspermia theory - that life all over the solar system/galaxy/universe is all related thanks to bacteria catching rides on asteroids and comets. We already know it is possible for rocks to be thrown away from a planet by something like an asteroid impact or large volcanic eruption - some meteorites have had their lineage traced back to mars.

So do you believe the panspermia theory to be plausible? what about alien life in general?

asker

Anonymous asked: How would you compare what Rocket Lab is doing to what SpaceX is doing?

I think it comes down to different missions, SpaceX is in it to eventually put people on other planets, which is a long way off atm. RocketLab want to provide a economically viable platform for companies to launch satellites into orbit.

SpaceX has an average mission cost of about $100 million, something only Governments and high end companies can afford while Rocketlab’s electron rocket costs only $4.9 million to put a satellite into orbit.

Of course SpaceX does have the job of resupplying the ISS as well as other, more tasking missions, but regardless of that, a space program costing that much per mission is not sustainable. It Needs to be cheaper, which Rocketlab have accomplished with their light weight design, and efficient engine.

About two weeks ago Rocket Lab, an NZ firm based in Auckland, announced a new satellite launching rocket. 
The super-light weight design is comprised of advanced carbon fibre technology, combined with the efficiency of the patent pending Rutherford engines, (named after NZ born physicist Ernst Rutherford) the rocket will be able to deliver a 110kg (242 pounds) payload to a 500km (310 miles) orbit for an amazing $4.9 million! 
This probably doesnt sound like much, but with todays electronics 110kg is enough for any satellite, and the amazing thing is - $4.9m is barely anything compared to the $56-$100 million of other launch systems. $4.9 million is approximately 1000 times cheaper than each of the apollo missions.
Not to mention the incredibly low amount of fuel use - less than it takes to fly a 737 from San Fran to LA!
The figures speak for themselves, and as such rocketlab have already booked over 37 launches, with the first scheduled for next year. The ultimate goal is to be launching 100 a year.
And on a personal note - as i actually live in Auckland - I am So excited to see this happen! 100 launches a year = 2 a week, from what will hopefully be a launchpad within driving distance of home!

About two weeks ago Rocket Lab, an NZ firm based in Auckland, announced a new satellite launching rocket. 

The super-light weight design is comprised of advanced carbon fibre technology, combined with the efficiency of the patent pending Rutherford engines, (named after NZ born physicist Ernst Rutherford) the rocket will be able to deliver a 110kg (242 pounds) payload to a 500km (310 miles) orbit for an amazing $4.9 million! 

This probably doesnt sound like much, but with todays electronics 110kg is enough for any satellite, and the amazing thing is - $4.9m is barely anything compared to the $56-$100 million of other launch systems. $4.9 million is approximately 1000 times cheaper than each of the apollo missions.

Not to mention the incredibly low amount of fuel use - less than it takes to fly a 737 from San Fran to LA!

The figures speak for themselves, and as such rocketlab have already booked over 37 launches, with the first scheduled for next year. The ultimate goal is to be launching 100 a year.

And on a personal note - as i actually live in Auckland - I am So excited to see this happen! 100 launches a year = 2 a week, from what will hopefully be a launchpad within driving distance of home!

squidscientistas:

The Nyholm lab needs your support!  We’re launching a crowdfunding campaign to support our research on the Hawaiian Bobtail squid/Vibrio fischeri symbiosis!  If you love cephalopods please share!
https://experiment.com/projects/how-do-bobtail-squid-choose-their-glowing-bacterial-partner

squidscientistas:

The Nyholm lab needs your support!  We’re launching a crowdfunding campaign to support our research on the Hawaiian Bobtail squid/Vibrio fischeri symbiosis!  If you love cephalopods please share!

https://experiment.com/projects/how-do-bobtail-squid-choose-their-glowing-bacterial-partner

cool-critters:

Andean cock-of-the-rock (Rupicola peruvianus)

The Andean cock-of-the-rock is a medium-sized passerine bird of the Cotinga family native to Andean cloud forests in South America. It is widely regarded as the national bird of Peru. The species exhibits marked sexual dimorphism; the male has a large disk-like crest and scarlet or brilliant orange plumage, while the female is significantly darker and browner. Gatherings of males compete for breeding females with each male displaying its colourful plumage, bobbing and hopping, and making a variety of calls. After mating, the female makes a nest under a rocky overhang, incubates the eggs, and rears the young, all by herself. The Andean cock-of-the-rock eats a diet of many organisms. It consistently eats fruit and occasionally feeds on insects, amphibians, reptiles, and smaller mice.photo credits: chdwckvnstrsslh, Robert Baker, Glenn Bartley

pennyfornasa:

Does the “7 Minutes Of Terror” sound like a cheesy horror flick or a theme park ride to you? It’s not. That’s the phrase NASA used to describe the entry, descent and landing (also known as EDL) sequence of the Mars rover, Curiosity. Seven minutes is the time it took for Curiosity to go from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface of Mars. It was by far the most complicated and ambitious Mars landing ever attempted.

It required a carefully orchestrated set of maneuvers that had to be controlled entirely by computer. Even the slightest error could mean disaster. The spacecraft began to decelerate as it entered the Martian atmosphere and was guided using small rockets, then at approximately 1,000 mph a supersonic parachute was deployed to further slow the descent allowing the heat shield to separate at around 370 mph. Curiosity then separated from its parachute and began its powered descent at 70 mph using retrorockets that slowed the rover and brought it close enough to the surface that it could be lowered to the ground via a sky crane. It was a daring feat of engineering that captivated the world had everyone holding their breath until they heard the words of the mission controller, “Touchdown confirmed. We’re safe on Mars!”

Watch the “7 Minutes Of Terror” http://youtu.be/Ki_Af_o9Q9s

Download the full infographic here: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/infographics/infographic.view.php?id=10776

Anyone else think the “7 Minutes Of Terror” would make an awesome theme park ride?

sciencesourceimages:

"Hey Buddy, Your Gills Are Showing!"

Nudibranches, also known as true Sea Slugs, are some of the most colorful creatures on earth. In the course of their evolution, these members of the mollusk family, lost their shell while developing alternative defense mechanisms. The name, Nudibranch, means “naked gills”. These gills (branches) can clearly be seen in each of the images above. The twin structures at the opposite end of these creatures are called Rhinophores and are used to sense chemicals in the water.

Click here to see more photos of Nudibranches

Nudibranchs are carnivorous, feeding on invertebrates like sea sponges, hydrozoids and sometimes other nudibranches. Some of them are even known to store toxins from their prey for future use. The bright colors of these creatures warn predators that they are poisonous. Nudibranchs are hermaphroditic and bear a set of reproductive organs for both sexes, though they cannot fertilize themselves.

Images above © Scubazoo / Science Source

exploratorium:


Amoebae use molecular mechanisms to move. Despite their tiny size, they’re giants compared to other types of cells!

exploratorium:

Amoebae use molecular mechanisms to move. Despite their tiny size, they’re giants compared to other types of cells!

dogwoof:

Dinosaur 13 - in cinemas 15th August

T-Rex, The Discovery of a Life Time - A Documentary