thatscienceguy:

Despite Appearances, this creature, the Wolf Eel, is one of the natural worlds true wonders - they are remarkably friendly.
Wolf eels having never seen a human diver before will not fear it, not attack it, but investigate and most likely come to the conclusion that this human can help scratch its back.
They are the worlds friendliest animals!
(Someone asked ‘but what about dogs?’ and, well, have you tried petting a wild dog…?)

thatscienceguy:

Despite Appearances, this creature, the Wolf Eel, is one of the natural worlds true wonders - they are remarkably friendly.

Wolf eels having never seen a human diver before will not fear it, not attack it, but investigate and most likely come to the conclusion that this human can help scratch its back.

They are the worlds friendliest animals!

(Someone asked ‘but what about dogs?’ and, well, have you tried petting a wild dog…?)

thatscienceguy:

The inside of an Ant Colony!
The industrialisation skills of those little creatures continue to amaze me!

thatscienceguy:

The inside of an Ant Colony!

The industrialisation skills of those little creatures continue to amaze me!

thatscienceguy:

A shoe Coated in Hydrophobic Material!

thatscienceguy:

A shoe Coated in Hydrophobic Material!

thatscienceguy:

The glass tank is filled with a gas called Sulfur Hexafluoride which is a one of the more dense gases, and it also happens to be as transparent as air so it gives the illusion of something floating in mid air, when it is really just acting like a boat in water.

thatscienceguy:

The glass tank is filled with a gas called Sulfur Hexafluoride which is a one of the more dense gases, and it also happens to be as transparent as air so it gives the illusion of something floating in mid air, when it is really just acting like a boat in water.

thatscienceguy:

Stars are Huge Nuclear Explosions that are so large their own gravity keeps it in place.

image

thatscienceguy:

The Venezuelan Poodle Moth was only recently discovered and identified as a species of moth in 2009.

thatscienceguy:

pobody:

physicsphysics:

thatscienceguy:

Simple House Hold Science Trick: Glowing Water
This one’s really simple, All you need;
 A black light (UV lamp) - You can find this from places like walmart, hardware stores, or you can order it online, here.
Highligher pen
Regular or Tonic Water
Now simply break open the highlighter, remove the felt and soak it in water for a few minutes. If you’re using Tonic water you can skip this step, you will not need the highlighter.
Find a dark room and place the water infront of the UV lamp.
and you’re done, Enjoy!

One more cool tip: If you already have something that glows after being exposed to regular light, try exposing it to a UV/Black light instead. It will be incredibly bright in a matter of seconds!

Wait, what is it about the tonic water that makes it glow like this?

To answer that you have to understand why things glow in the first place;
It’s called the Photoelectric Effect - When an Electro-magnetic wave (photon) passes through a substance it sometimes interacts with the electrons in the atoms. (only interacts with the electron and not the proton because they both have the same field strength yet the electron weighs roughly 2000 times less.) The electron absorbs the energy from the photon and becomes ‘excited,’ jumping up an energy level, then when it falls back down an energy level it releases a new photon in a random direction. so instead of just reflected/refracting light, it actually gives off it’s own light.
This only works when the original photon is of high enough frequency (more energy) which is why the UV torchlight is needed - Ultra Violet light has a higher frequency than visable light.
It also depends on the atom itself, some atoms/molecules have a lower threshold frequency than others (that is why some things don’t glow under UV light) and so there would be something present in the tonic water, in this case Quinine, that makes it glow.

thatscienceguy:

pobody:

physicsphysics:

thatscienceguy:

Simple House Hold Science Trick: Glowing Water

This one’s really simple, All you need;

  •  A black light (UV lamp) - You can find this from places like walmart, hardware stores, or you can order it online, here.
  • Highligher pen
  • Regular or Tonic Water

Now simply break open the highlighter, remove the felt and soak it in water for a few minutes. If you’re using Tonic water you can skip this step, you will not need the highlighter.

Find a dark room and place the water infront of the UV lamp.

and you’re done, Enjoy!

One more cool tip: If you already have something that glows after being exposed to regular light, try exposing it to a UV/Black light instead. It will be incredibly bright in a matter of seconds!

Wait, what is it about the tonic water that makes it glow like this?

To answer that you have to understand why things glow in the first place;

It’s called the Photoelectric Effect - When an Electro-magnetic wave (photon) passes through a substance it sometimes interacts with the electrons in the atoms. (only interacts with the electron and not the proton because they both have the same field strength yet the electron weighs roughly 2000 times less.) The electron absorbs the energy from the photon and becomes ‘excited,’ jumping up an energy level, then when it falls back down an energy level it releases a new photon in a random direction. so instead of just reflected/refracting light, it actually gives off it’s own light.

This only works when the original photon is of high enough frequency (more energy) which is why the UV torchlight is needed - Ultra Violet light has a higher frequency than visable light.

It also depends on the atom itself, some atoms/molecules have a lower threshold frequency than others (that is why some things don’t glow under UV light) and so there would be something present in the tonic water, in this case Quinine, that makes it glow.

thatscienceguy:

Liquid Nitrogen on a surface coated with an aerogel powder resulting in some interesting properties.
Video

thatscienceguy:

Liquid Nitrogen on a surface coated with an aerogel powder resulting in some interesting properties.

Video

thatscienceguy:

your brain always moulds everything it sees together, trying to connect everything. take a look at each individual dot. they’re all moving in straight lines.

thatscienceguy:

your brain always moulds everything it sees together, trying to connect everything. take a look at each individual dot. they’re all moving in straight lines.

thatscienceguy:

Where the different rules of physics apply:
Regular, otherwise known as Newtonian physics only applies on the average, everyday, scale. That is, objects larger than an atom at low energy, where energy in this context refers to velocity and (sometimes) temperature.
Once you step it up, increasing to high energy levels, (when velocity approaches c, the speed of light) newtonian physics no longer works due do what we call relativity, and observations or calculations need to take into account this effect usually using some form of the Lorentz factor,
gamma = [ 1 - (v^2)/(c^2) ]^(-1/2)
On the other hand, if you keep to a low energy system but bring the scale down to sub-atomic particles, such as electrons, things change yet again, but this time in an entirely new way. This is where Wave-Particle dualtity theory comes into play, the theory that waves (namely electromagnetic, i.e. light) are particles, and particles are wave packets. not only do you need to account for this, but you also need to take into account Heisenbergs uncertainty principle; It is impossible to know both the exact velocity and exact position of a sub atomic particle, the more certain you make one the less certain the other becomes.
Finally we come to Quantum Field Theory, which i honestly do not know anything about, at least i won’t until third year physics when i start taking courses on it.

thatscienceguy:

Where the different rules of physics apply:

Regular, otherwise known as Newtonian physics only applies on the average, everyday, scale. That is, objects larger than an atom at low energy, where energy in this context refers to velocity and (sometimes) temperature.

Once you step it up, increasing to high energy levels, (when velocity approaches c, the speed of light) newtonian physics no longer works due do what we call relativity, and observations or calculations need to take into account this effect usually using some form of the Lorentz factor,

gamma = [ 1 - (v^2)/(c^2) ]^(-1/2)

On the other hand, if you keep to a low energy system but bring the scale down to sub-atomic particles, such as electrons, things change yet again, but this time in an entirely new way. This is where Wave-Particle dualtity theory comes into play, the theory that waves (namely electromagnetic, i.e. light) are particles, and particles are wave packets. not only do you need to account for this, but you also need to take into account Heisenbergs uncertainty principle; It is impossible to know both the exact velocity and exact position of a sub atomic particle, the more certain you make one the less certain the other becomes.

Finally we come to Quantum Field Theory, which i honestly do not know anything about, at least i won’t until third year physics when i start taking courses on it.

thatscienceguy:

Math is Beautiful, math is the absolute truth and that makes it beautiful. Mathematicians even go so far as calling it an art form. 

mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show - Bertrand Russel 

One of the most amazing equations, in my opinion, is the Lorentz factor, 

Virtually all of the mathematics behind Einsteins theory or special relativity can be reduced back to this one, simple equation. basically, these few lines describe exactly what happens when you travel close to the speed of light, and the fact that it is as simple and short as it is, is beautiful.

thatscienceguy:

Math is Beautiful, math is the absolute truth and that makes it beautiful. Mathematicians even go so far as calling it an art form. 

mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show - Bertrand Russel 

One of the most amazing equations, in my opinion, is the Lorentz factor, 

Virtually all of the mathematics behind Einsteins theory or special relativity can be reduced back to this one, simple equation. basically, these few lines describe exactly what happens when you travel close to the speed of light, and the fact that it is as simple and short as it is, is beautiful.

mucholderthen:

Destination Moon: The 350-Year History of Lunar Exploration
Infographic by Karl Tate
July 16, 2014  ||  Space.com