Is Pluto a Planet Again?

Short answer: No.

I have seen far too many posts lately about Pluto being reinstated as a planet by Harvard astronomers - but that’s quite far from the truth.

What actually happened was a debate, and at the end of the debate the audience (Which was open to the public!!!) was asked to vote on whether it should be a planet or not.

And the funny thing is - that wasn’t even what the debate was about. It was about whether or not dwarf planets should be considered a subsection of planets, instead of an entirely separate (though related) section of celestial objects. (Like asteroids and comets.)

Now i disagree with this, for the simple fact that if pluto were a planet, it would mean so are the other 5000-odd objects that are JUST LIKE pluto itself. we would go from having 8 to having 5000+, not 9.

But what do you think?

10 Science Misconceptions

As with all things, ideas and concepts get changed over time due to word of mouth and end up being wrong. So here is 10 Science Misconceptions to set the record straight. 

Video by 

https://www.youtube.com/user/EsEinsteinium03

mindblowingscience:

U.S. Creates Largest Protected Area in the World, 3X Larger Than California

The Obama administration announced late Wednesday that it is creating the largest marine reserve in the world by expanding an existing monument around seven U.S.-controlled islands and atolls in the central Pacific.
The Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument will now be nearly 490,000 square miles, nearly three times the size of California and six times larger than its previous size. Commercial fishing, dumping, and mining will be prohibited in the reserve, but recreational fishing will be allowed with permits, and boaters may visit the area.
The protected area that President Barack Obama will officially announce Thursday morning is actually smaller than the 782,000 square miles that the president initially considered. But environmentalists, preservationists, and conservation groups that had pushed for the expansion called Obama’s designation a historic victory in their efforts to limit the impact of fishing, drilling, and other activities that threaten some of the world’s most species-rich waters.
"What has happened is extraordinary. It is history making. There is a lot of reason we should be celebrating right now," said Elliott Norse, founder and chief scientist of the Seattle-based Marine Conservation Institute.
Enric Sala, an ocean scientist and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, called the newly expanded monument “a great example of marine protection.”

Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

U.S. Creates Largest Protected Area in the World, 3X Larger Than California

The Obama administration announced late Wednesday that it is creating the largest marine reserve in the world by expanding an existing monument around seven U.S.-controlled islands and atolls in the central Pacific.

The Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument will now be nearly 490,000 square miles, nearly three times the size of California and six times larger than its previous size. Commercial fishing, dumping, and mining will be prohibited in the reserve, but recreational fishing will be allowed with permits, and boaters may visit the area.

The protected area that President Barack Obama will officially announce Thursday morning is actually smaller than the 782,000 square miles that the president initially considered. But environmentalists, preservationists, and conservation groups that had pushed for the expansion called Obama’s designation a historic victory in their efforts to limit the impact of fishing, drilling, and other activities that threaten some of the world’s most species-rich waters.

"What has happened is extraordinary. It is history making. There is a lot of reason we should be celebrating right now," said Elliott Norse, founder and chief scientist of the Seattle-based Marine Conservation Institute.

Enric Sala, an ocean scientist and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence, called the newly expanded monument “a great example of marine protection.”

Continue Reading.

(via cosmo-nautic)

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

yeah, no. actually only the red sparks/flames and the black (its dark green in real life, but black in the gif) ash is a result of ammonium dichromate. 
The tentacle-like things that spew from the middle is a result of burning mercury thiocyanate. 

ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

yeah, no. actually only the red sparks/flames and the black (its dark green in real life, but black in the gif) ash is a result of ammonium dichromate. 

The tentacle-like things that spew from the middle is a result of burning mercury thiocyanate. 

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Adding just a few polymers to a liquid can substantially change its behavior. The presence of polymers turns otherwise Newtonian fluids like water into viscoelastic fluids. When deformed, viscoelastic fluids have a response that is part viscous—like other fluids—and part elastic—like a rubber band that regains its initial shape. The collage above shows what happens to a thinning column of a viscoelastic fluid. Instead of breaking into a stream of droplets, the liquid forms drop connected with a thin filament, like beads on a string. In a Newtonian fluid, surface tension would tend to break off the drops at their narrowest point, but stretching the polymers in the viscoelastic fluid provides just enough normal stress to keep the filament intact. If the effect looks familiar, it may be because you’ve seen it in the mirror. Human saliva is a viscoelastic liquid! (Image credit: A. Wagner et al.)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Adding just a few polymers to a liquid can substantially change its behavior. The presence of polymers turns otherwise Newtonian fluids like water into viscoelastic fluids. When deformed, viscoelastic fluids have a response that is part viscous—like other fluids—and part elastic—like a rubber band that regains its initial shape. The collage above shows what happens to a thinning column of a viscoelastic fluid. Instead of breaking into a stream of droplets, the liquid forms drop connected with a thin filament, like beads on a string. In a Newtonian fluid, surface tension would tend to break off the drops at their narrowest point, but stretching the polymers in the viscoelastic fluid provides just enough normal stress to keep the filament intact. If the effect looks familiar, it may be because you’ve seen it in the mirror. Human saliva is a viscoelastic liquid! (Image credit: A. Wagner et al.)

jayalice:

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Riley combines scientific research with media savvy to take his ideas to a mass audience. His talk describes how he balances the two sometimes opposing worlds of media and science.

Riley Elliott is a PhD candidate at the University of Auckland. With an Honours degree in Zoology and Masters with distinction in Marine Science from Otago University, Riley ventured to South Africa to find his true passion - sharks. Being a surfer, free diver and spear-fisherman, Riley wanted to understand why sharks instilled so much fear in people and whether it was warranted. What he found was far worse – sharks are in rapid decline, receiving little sympathy due to their demonised stereotype.

Through the combination of high-tech science and stimulating visual imagery, Riley explains how conventional scientific communication can move at the speed of modern day media to achieve conservational goals. Riley is now utilising this form of communication to address international issues as the presenter of Shark Man TV.

asker

gojira--gojira asked: I think with math, it is complex, yet can be satisfying to understand, but it also depends on who is teaching the subject. There are teachers who will teach math in a way that's boring and stressful, no added fun into finding the answer and all. I've hated math, just because I've had so many teachers that were snobby and made me uninterested in math, based on their attitude and teaching style.

Thank you, that was something i forgot to mention.

I also think teaching style has a big role in it. I had 1 teacher in year 11 (15 year olds) who was just ecstatic about math, he loved it, and it showed in his teaching style. I was already interested in mathematics by the time i had him as a teacher, so i guess that played a big role in my education.

But if you have a bad teacher, i really hope you blame the teacher and not the subject. incompetent teachers play an enormous role in the failure of education systems.

Luckily at the university level all lecturers are enthusiastic about what they’re teaching, and its wonderful to see them teach it.

asker

Anonymous asked: A lot of people just don't have the type of brain to ever understand it! Do you think writing essays and poetry is fun?

I always hated this explanation.

I completely disagree with the whole two sides of a brain argument - where a person is either more interested in art and music and literature, OR science and mathematics.

I do actually enjoy poetry, anon. And depending on the subject - i also enjoy writing essays. I love history, and politics, and creative writing (i even tried writing fanfic, though my grammar was horrible at the time.)

I think it just comes down to a lack of understanding, people see numbers and think ‘ew’ and so they don’t even try to understand what they mean, and so many people complain when they’re first taught algebra - “letters have no place in math.” Well i haven’t seen any number in mathematics in years, its all just letters. Real mathematics is a general solution, and general solutions have no numbers.

The most common answer im getting is “It’s the way its taught. incorrect answers are punished, etc.” 

(Answers to This post about mathematics)

Which I think is quite comical, literally every school subject is taught like that, except maybe art. Get the wrong date in a history essay? you get penalized. Spell a word wrong in english? Penalized. Say the wrong meaning of a word in spanish? Penalized.

And yet still math is hated more than any of those subjects.

I was also getting a lot of learning dissibilites as a problem, which i accept as a problem for some people (dyscalculia is like dyslexia with numbers.)

I think a big problem is people hear all the time that math is hard, that its boring and that its confusing, so kids going into middle school or high school seeing new problems in mathematics and having a few difficulties understanding them give up far too quickly. No one understands math right away, unless you’re one of those very few 1-in-a-million math geniuses that get doctorates at the age of 17. Everyone struggles at first, but if you try and try and try you will understand it, and trust me when i say this - it is fun!

I remember this one time in year 13 (last year of high school) i was with a few friends and they were all studying for a math test, I had found this one question earlier that seemed close to impossible, no one could do - so i sat there while my friends were all studying, trying to do this one problem and it took literally 4 hours straight - but i did it. and it was an amazing feeling finally finishing it, it was like doing a jigsaw puzzle but having 1 missing piece and finding it after hours of searching.

And since then I always use the analogy - Math is like a puzzle, and should be approached with the same attitude as every other puzzle - like its a fun challenge.

Why do people actually hate mathematics??

This isnt one of those posts explaining a question posed in the title… i’m actually curious - I Love mathematics.

I dont understand how people don’t like it, even when i find a concept hard to understand (which has been a lot, lately) I still enjoy it and want to figure it out. I have always loved it, all the way up through high school and now i’m majoring in it (and physics) at university. I honestly don’t understand why it gets so much hate, It’s Fun!! 

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 

Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.

For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.

The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.

Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.

You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/

All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE

 

Plankton Found on the Exterior of the International Space Station!
While examining samples taken from the exterior surface of the ISS, scientists discovered something completely unexpected - Marine Plankton living on the surface, despite the harsh condition (Vacuum, temperature, and radiation.)
There was evidence that the plankton had been living there for years, and possibly even developing, too.
This gives more plausibility to the panspermia theory - that life all over the solar system/galaxy/universe is all related thanks to bacteria catching rides on asteroids and comets. We already know it is possible for rocks to be thrown away from a planet by something like an asteroid impact or large volcanic eruption - some meteorites have had their lineage traced back to mars.
So do you believe the panspermia theory to be plausible? what about alien life in general?

Plankton Found on the Exterior of the International Space Station!

While examining samples taken from the exterior surface of the ISS, scientists discovered something completely unexpected - Marine Plankton living on the surface, despite the harsh condition (Vacuum, temperature, and radiation.)

There was evidence that the plankton had been living there for years, and possibly even developing, too.

This gives more plausibility to the panspermia theory - that life all over the solar system/galaxy/universe is all related thanks to bacteria catching rides on asteroids and comets. We already know it is possible for rocks to be thrown away from a planet by something like an asteroid impact or large volcanic eruption - some meteorites have had their lineage traced back to mars.

So do you believe the panspermia theory to be plausible? what about alien life in general?

asker

Anonymous asked: How would you compare what Rocket Lab is doing to what SpaceX is doing?

I think it comes down to different missions, SpaceX is in it to eventually put people on other planets, which is a long way off atm. RocketLab want to provide a economically viable platform for companies to launch satellites into orbit.

SpaceX has an average mission cost of about $100 million, something only Governments and high end companies can afford while Rocketlab’s electron rocket costs only $4.9 million to put a satellite into orbit.

Of course SpaceX does have the job of resupplying the ISS as well as other, more tasking missions, but regardless of that, a space program costing that much per mission is not sustainable. It Needs to be cheaper, which Rocketlab have accomplished with their light weight design, and efficient engine.